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Don’t Let Grease Guns Get In the Way of Improving Your Productivity.

Heavy equipment operators have alternatives when it comes to manually greasing machines.

Heavy equipment owners and operators understand the critical role grease plays in preventative maintenance programs. Daily grease practices can be overlooked, especially when you’re relying on an operator to hit up to 50 grease points with a grease gun.  On the surface, manual grease guns and tubes of moly or synthetic grease may seem like a cost-effective solution for equipment lubrication, but you must factor in some important considerations when deciding what’s right for you – operator inconsistencies and machine downtime.


The trouble with grease guns

Grease guns have been the go-to greasing tool for heavy equipment for years. But like most technologies, there are innovative solutions introduced. Manual hand pump grease guns made way to battery operated grease guns, reducing operator fatigue and shortening the time it takes to grease a piece of equipment. However, battery operated grease guns still require considerable time to grease a machine, and some of the same problems found in hand pump grease guns remain present in battery powered counterparts such as over greasing, under greasing, difficulties with couplers attaching to grease fittings and safety concerns with lube points near high heat or hard to reach locations.


The benefits of auto greasing heavy equipment

Automatic lubrication not only changes the way we grease our equipment, but also eliminates many of the issues surrounding manual lubrication with grease guns.

Automatic lubrication saves roughly an hour of equipment greasing per machine each day. As production demands continue to grow, the traditional method of dedicating an hour to greasing often results in shortcuts like skipping difficult grease points. During the most demanding times the entire hour may be completely neglected.

Automatic lubrication systems apply calculated amounts of grease to every fitting, meaning no more arbitrary amounts of grease being applied to every lube point. Manual greasing is based solely on the person operating the grease gun; when grease begins oozing out of the fitting this is the sign that the fitting doesn’t take any more grease. However, overflowing grease may also be caused by a poor fitting connection or dirt in the grease fitting causing a clog. Without proper diagnoses, the lube point may not be getting the adequate amount of grease.

Automatic lubrication reduces safety risks found in manual grease practices. Changing weather conditions, hard to reach grease locations, and hands carrying grease guns all play into potential safety risk associated with greasing equipment – like slips and falls, burns and other work related injuries.


The unique properties of grease in auto lube systems

If you’ve used a grease gun, undoubtedly you’ve greased with NLGI #2 or #1. One of the primary reasons that manual greasing calls for heavier, or NLGI #2 grease is because the heavier or the “stickiness” of the grease is often perceived as higher quality grease. But with auto lube, grease properties are unique.

NLGI grease ratings for auto lube systems are as low as #0 to #00. Systems pump smaller amounts of grease more frequently while the machine operates, ensuring a constant flow of grease that lubricates entire pins, so heavier grease is not needed.    

manual greasing pivot point
Auto greasing equipment pivot point

Auto greasing increases lifetime equipment productivity and profitability

Although the initial investment for auto lube may seem substantial, the ROI from automatic lubrication can be quick. It’s not uncommon for break-even costs to be less than a year on a machine operating daily. 

ROI is calculated by not only the downtime caused by manual greasing, but by component failures resulting from inadequate greasing practices. Take the typical costs of downtime and repairs and balance it with the cost of the auto lube system to discover the break-even cost. 

Costs range for auto greasing systems on heavy equipment – with installation costs dictated heavily by the amount of grease line routing and protection required. For machines that have grease points in open areas the grease lines need to be well protected from the daily rigor of operation. Equipment costs depend on pump size and the number of grease fittings that require lubrication. For heavy equipment with many grease fittings the cost of the system is dispersed, because much of the system cost is in the grease pump.


Learn more about Graco automatic greasing systems

The basic components of an automatic lubrication system are a metering device, pump, controller, tubing/hose, and fittings to connect to the grease points. Many accessories are also available to enhance or compliment the operation of a system. Graco offers complete automatic lubrication systems for several machines, including excavators, wheel loaders, mining trucks, ag tractors, combines, forestry equipment and more. 

#source GRACO Lubrication

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Lift Inspections – Preventive Maintenance – Service

Why Preventive Maintenance?



SMART – Your Auto Lifts allow you to make thousands of dollars every week. A lift out of service results in lost revenue. You need your techs making money, not excuses. Minor repairs and needed adjustments will minimize downtime and major breakdowns.

SAFETY – When you consider that the purpose of an auto lift is to raise thousands of pounds over your head, you realize; Your Auto Lifts Safety Devices Are Essential! Your employees, customers, and OSHA expect you to provide a SAFE working environment. A lift that fails while a customers vehicle is in the air will cost you in repairs to the customer’s vehicle and possibly injure an employee, or worse…

PROFESSIONAL
 – As an Owner/Manager you set the standards for your business.
Like a car, Preventive Maintenance increases performance, longevity, and safety of operation.

Call your insurance agent to if they offer discounts for establishing a documented Preventative Maintenance Program for your equipment. Contact Wiley Equipment today to find out more. 1-800-490-5389

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Air Regulators and Lubrication Pumps

Do I need an air regulator on my oil and grease pumps?

Yes, absolutely yes! Every oil and grease pump needs an air regulator. Too little air and the pump won’t pump. Too much air and the pump will wear out sooner and you will have control problems.

Pumps should be set somewhere between 60 PSI and 90 PSI. If you are running a thin product like ATF, then set your air regulator closer to the 60 PSI mark. But if you are running a thicker product like gear oil, then set your air pressure closer to the 90 PSI mark.

Finally, if your pipe runs are long, say over 150 feet and your output on the far end is slow, you can turn up the air pressure to push the extra distance.

Hope this helps!

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Why is Waste Oil Management Important?

Discover Best Practices For Waste Oil Management

Proper management of waste oil, used oil that now contains chemical or physical impurities, has never been more important. Each year, Americans use nearly 1.3 billion gallons of motor oil, but less than half is reprocessed by recyclers. Oil spills can cost businesses or municipalities at least $20,000 for cleanup and fines levied by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plus state or local agencies. 

Clean water is increasingly viewed as one of our most precious natural resources, yet used motor oil is the largest single source of oil pollution in our lakes, rivers, and streams. It takes only one quart of oil to pollute ground or surface water sources and make 250,000 gallons of water unfit for drinking. 

Removing oil from a vehicle and placing it in a bulk storage tank sounds easy, yet spills can and do occur all too often. Some spills result when waste oil is added to an already full bulk oil tank that no one knew had reached capacity.

Steps For Proper Disposal Of Waste Oil

  • Carefully drain engine oil into a barrel with a capture funnel or drain cart.
  • Use a good-quality pump, hose, and control valve system to pump the waste oil from the barrel or drain cart directly into a bulk waste oil tank.
  • Always use separate containers and pump systems for waste oil and antifreeze to prevent them from being contaminated. Clearly label each.
  • Use an automatic tank level monitoring system to prevent the bulk waste oil tank from reaching capacity and possibly overflowing. Look for a pump system that automatically shuts off when the tank is full to prevent overflow accidents.
  • Be prepared for a potential waste oil spill by having sorbent materials on hand to promptly contain and clean up any spills that occur.
  • Train employees and communicate the importance of safe waste oil handling best practices to help prevent oil spills and ensure a safer work environment.

It’s more important than ever to carefully capture and properly transport every drop of waste oil in fleet maintenance facilities. The consequences of not doing so are steep fines, polluted surface and groundwater, and potentially a damaged reputation for the company or municipality involved in an oil spill.

If you have questions or need more information on pumps, drain carts or bulk waste oil tank monitoring systems, contact Wiley Equipment Company. 1-800 – 490-5389. www.wileyequipment.com info@wileyequipment.com

Sources

http://www.adem.state.al.us/programs/water/nps/take/cleangw.pdf
https://cfpub.epa.gov/npstbx/files/KSMO_oil.pdf
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Down Tubes

Originally, oil pumps from the various manufactures like Alemite, Balcrank, Graco and Lincoln came as full-length pumps. Normally these pumps would fit either a 55 gallon drum or a typical 36″ tall oil tank. But as many more tanks started being built at various other sizes it became apparent that oil pumps could not come as one length fitting all situations.

So the various manufactures started producing what most of us in the industry call stub pumps. These stub pumps are now the industry standard and they require adding on an additional length of pipe to complete the pump set up. They are most often called down tubes but they are also referred to as suction tubes.

Normally made of black pipe or PVC their diameter depends on the bottom diameter of the receiving oil pump. The most popular down tube diameter sizes are: 3/4″ 1″, 1 1/4″, 1 1/2″

Downtube length will vary depending on the container that the pump is going into.

The downtube is threaded on one end and that is the end that will be screwed into the lower portion of the oil pump. The other end should be cut at a slight angle so it can easily suck up the oil within the tank.

You can make these down tubes yourself or you can purchase them from Wiley Equipment Company. Just simply give us a call and tell us the height of the container the pump will go into. And what oil pump you wish to buy and we can make the proper length for you.

Give us a call. 1-800-490-5389

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Discover What Components Make Up A Typical Automatic Lubrication System

This blog comes to us from :

GRACO – Jack Koenig – Industrial Lubrication Field Application Engineer

Lubrication is critical in ensuring equipment keeps moving and your operating costs are reduced.  Without proper lubrication, your equipment can suffer from downtime and reduced life, which impacts your company’s bottom line. Automatic lubrication could be the answer.

Why Automatic Lubrication?

Automatic lubrication systems provide consistent lubrication on a more frequent basis. Too little or too much lubricant will result in friction and heat, creating a drag on the bearing and damaging the bearing’s seals. Furthermore, the best time to lubricate a bearing is while equipment is moving. This causes an unsafe and almost impossible task for equipment operators. Automatic lubrication provides a safer method of supplying the precise amount of lubrication to bearings, bushings and other lubrication points when it’s needed. 

Basic Components Of An Automation Lubrication System

The basic components of an automatic lubrication system are a metering device, pump, controller, tubing/hose, and fittings to connect to the lubrication points. Many accessories are also available to enhance or complement the operation of a system.  Graco offers complete automatic lubrication systems for several industries, including in-plant industrial manufacturing, mining, construction (heavy equipment), food and beverage, energy and on-road mobile applications.  

Metering Device 

At the heart of every automatic lubrication system is a metering device. People often ask why they can’t just put a tee in the line to serve two points. The fluid in such a system would take the path of least resistance, leading it to only one of the points. To prevent fluid from taking the path of least resistance we use metering devices. 

GL-1 Injectors

Pump

The pump provides a flow of oil or grease under pressure to actuate the metering device(s). Various pumps offer a variety of flow rates and pressure ranges – and compatibility with various power sources – so the selection of the pump will be based on the needs of the system and what power sources are available. Pumps used with injectors must also include a vent valve so the injectors can reset. Some pumps are also meters, such as the piston pumps used in a box lubricator, but most of the time the pump is a separate unit.

Controller

A controller runs a schedule or program to dispense lubrication on a regular basis. Some pumps have a built-in controller, but many systems use a controller that is separate from the pump. Because the controllers are programmable, they are very versatile and therefore a few controllers can cover a broad range of applications. Some things to consider are the voltage available and the sensors used in the application. The controller needs to have inputs for the sensors that will be connected to it.

Tubing and Fittings

The correct tubing must be used when selecting system components because it needs to be strong enough to handle the pressure developed in the system, and it needs to be of sufficient diameter to allow the grease or oil to flow through it without creating excessive pressure. If the tubing is too weak it could burst and make a mess; or worse, it could injure someone. If the tubing is too narrow the system may not function at all because the pressure required to move the fluid through the tubing could be too high. Therefore, it is important to understand the needs of the application when selecting the tubing or hoses for the system

Optional Parts

A wide variety of optional components are available for each system. Here are just a few examples:

  • Sensors to detect cycle or pressure
  • Filters for oil or grease and for air
  • Stroke sensor for machine count
  • Check valves

While a lubrication system may seem complicated at first glance, when broken down into its basic components, it is actually fairly simple. Understanding these components will make it easier to design and order parts for a system, as well as troubleshoot and repair an existing system

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Alemite Pumps – Which Kit?

I’m going slightly off-topic for a moment. We get calls asking which kit they need when repairing Alemite Oil Pumps. I’ll focus on the most popular series of Alemite Oil Pumps – the 9900 series.

Produced by Alemite for approximately 20 years, these pumps are easy to overhaul if you take your time and follow the included instructions. Probably the most popular is the Alemite 9968 Oil Pump. A 5:1 Oil Pump, it is the workhorse of the Alemite line. Easy to repair, you can actually repair the air motor while the pump is still in the tank.

So which kit for the Alemite 9968 Oil Pump? It all depends on what your pump is doing or not doing. First, make sure there is oil in the tank deep enough for the pump to suck from. Rags have been known to get sucked up into the lover tube. Second, is your air on and getting to the pump? Sometimes the air regulator fails and the pump won’t operate without air.

After that, we work “down” the pump. If the pump hisses air but doesn’t actually pump then it’s in the upper air motor and you will need the Alemite 393706 kit. By the way, this kit is the most popular. If the pump is “silent” and you have checked the lower end for blockage, it is most likely in the air motor and the 393706 kit is the one you want.

If your Alemite 9968 oil pump is leaking through the little hole underneath the air motor you will need the Alemite 393715 kit. Also if your pump is “pumping” but little or nothing is coming out, it is most likely in the lower end and the Alemite 393715 kit would be the right kit for you.

Hope that helps!

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Oil Pumps

Air- operated oil Pumps are found in thousands of auto shops throughout the United States. Manufactured by such companies as Alemite, Balcrank, Graco, Lincoln, and others, these pumps are the backbone of the lubrication industry. Typically these pumps will last 5 or more years before needing service to restore them to like-new condition. Given reasonable condition to work in, they can last for many, many years.

The first step in choosing the right oil pump is understanding that oil pumps come in different “strengths”. These strengths are expressed as ratios. The most common are 1:1, 3:1 and 5:1. As ratios increase, the ability of the oil pump to pump greater distances also increases. 1:1 oil pumps will push most oils 50 feet. 3:1 oil pumps will push most oils 100 feet. While 5:1 oil pumps will push most oils 200 feet.

By the way, these distances exclude the oil reels with their various lengths of hose that may be attached at the end of the oil piping. When determining the distance you are pumping ignore the reels as long as you feel that your techs won’t be pumping more than two at the same time. Also, know that lighter oils pump easier than heavier oils. Gear oil often needs a higher ratio oil pump while ATF may not.

More to come….

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Discover Best Practices For Waste Oil Management

Waste Oil Equipment

Proper management of waste oil, used oil that now contains chemical or physical impurities, has never been more important. Each year, Americans use nearly 1.3 billion gallons of motor oil, but less than half is reprocessed by recyclers. Oil spills can cost businesses or municipalities at least $20,000 for cleanup and fines levied by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plus state or local agencies

Clean water is increasingly viewed as one of our most precious natural resources, yet used motor oil is the largest single source of oil pollution in our lakes, rivers and streams. It takes only one quart of oil to pollute ground or surface water sources and make 250,000 gallons of water unfit for drinking. Removing oil from a vehicle and placing it in a bulk storage tank sounds easy, yet spills can and do occur all too often. Some spills result when waste oil is added to an already full bulk oil tank that no one knew had reached capacity.

Steps For Proper Disposal Of Waste Oil

  • Carefully drain engine oil into a barrel with a capture funnel or drain cart.
  • Use a good-quality pump, hose and control valve system to pump the waste oil from the barrel or drain cart directly into a bulk waste oil tank.
  • Always use separate containers and pump systems for waste oil and antifreeze to prevent them from being contaminated. Clearly label each.
  • Use an automatic tank level monitoring system to prevent the bulk waste oil tank from reaching capacity and possibly overflowing. Look for a pump system that automatically shuts off when the tank is full to prevent overflow accidents.
  • Be prepared for a potential waste oil spill by having absorbent materials on hand to promptly contain and clean up any spills that occur.
  • Train employees and communicate the importance of safe waste oil handling best practices to help prevent oil spills and ensure a safer work environment. It’s more important than ever to carefully capture and properly transport every drop of waste oil in fleet maintenance facilities. The consequences of not doing so are steep fines, polluted surface and ground water, and potentially a damaged reputation for the company or municipality involved in an oil spill.

If you have questions or need more information on pumps, drain carts or bulk waste oil tank monitoring systems, contact Wiley Equipment today. 1-310-640-9093
Waste Oil Equipment

Sources: http://www.adem.state.al.us/programs/water/nps/take/cleangw.pdf
https://cfpub.epa.gov/npstbx/files/KSMO_oil.pdf

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Our Most Popular Oil Reel is the Heavy Duty Alemite Brand

With any large purchase, it’s comforting to know that what you’re buying has key qualities. It’s good to know that your money will be spent on something that is durable, reliable, and with optimum performance. This is the case of our most popular oil reel, the Alemite 8078-D Heavy Duty Oil Reel. This heavy duty tool is the missing piece to your shop. And, with four color options, you can match it to your other tools, or make it stand out so that it’s easier to find. Your choice. But, in the case of an oil reel, this should be your first choice. And, it’s available in our shop.

Your New Favorite Oil Reel Features

What’s important to you when you’re looking for an oil reel? How about it working with 95% of all applications? What about coming with a 50-foot oil hose? If those two things are on your list—or even if you didn’t think that far ahead, yet— this Alemite 8078-D oil reel has that included. It’s a whole package. When it comes to working efficiently in your shop or in your garage, there are different things that make life a little easier. That was kept in mind during the engineering of this product. It has an anti-lockout design that eliminates the need for manual release of the pawl when the hose is fully extended. And, sealed bearings prevent contamination and minimize maintenance. That in itself is an appealing factor.

Incredible Design

Alemite has designed this oil reel in a way that is versatile and flexible to your needs. Their sleek design allows you to mount the oil reel on the ceiling, wall, or floor. Additionally, the narrow design allows for efficient use of your space. So, whatever your preference may be, or whatever your space allows, this tool is as flexible as you. For a workspace that is completely yours, this will fit perfectly as a new addition—no need for interrupting the current flow or moving tools around. The Alemite 8078-D can be easily installed. And, with its durable heavy metal arbor design, it can withstand extreme stress. So, no need to be gentle with your new toy.

If all of that wasn’t enough, this new Alemite model has a guide arm with five positions that allow the hose to release at an optimum position. Plus, different versions are made available for oil, air/water, and grease. What more could you want in a product?

When you need a tool or product to make your garage work more efficient, look no further than Wiley Equipment. We keep our online store stocked with essentials and brand names that you can trust. We care about quality and the results that will come from the products we sell. Visit us online to browse all of our amazing products.